Posts Tagged ‘works on paper’

Derek Albeck

Published May 10, 2010 by Molly

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Los Angeles-based Derek Albeck is 90% deaf in one ear, enjoys the belligerent and skilled music of Lightning Bolt and is most productive early in the morning and late at night. He would describe his work, if asked by a stranger, as “drawings from phorographs of family and surroundings. The drawings are somewhat autobiographical and serve as memory maps of shared stories and experiences.”

This is all gleaned from the artist’s interview at Fecal Face, which we recommend checking out as well as his website. Albeck’s got some neat prints, books and zines on sale on there, and a whole bunch of crazily meticulous drawings that we think are just great.

Dan Bina

Published April 19, 2010 by Molly

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Science lesson!

The term “fluorescence”was coined by one George Gabriel Stokes in an 1852 paper for the Royal Society of London titled “On the Change of Refrangibility of Light”. Chemically speaking, fluorescence occurs when an orbital electron relaxes to its ground state after being excited to a higher quantum state by some kind of energy. Then it gets really complicated.

Fluorescent lights, on the other hand, were first brought to the public at the 1939 World’s Fair, and we can thank that event for eventually precipitating glow sticks and highlighter pens. At the very end of this long stream of influences lies Dan Bina, an artist who creates images that often incorporate hints of fluorescence. The paintings are magical—check ‘em out at Dan’s blog. Deploy shades if your eyes are sensitive.

Benjamin Degen

Published January 12, 2010 by Molly

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If the word “mind-bending” didn’t carry connotations of Magic Eye paintings and CGI technology and Timothy Leary, it would be the perfect descriptor of Benjamin Degen’s pieces. The Brooklyn-based artist fills his thoughtfully-drafted works on paper with nature, nudes, text, books and, why not, the Financial Times. Alternately folksy and futuristic, the works are rendered in graphite and colored pencil with shading that will give you shivers. Ready, set, explore.