Posts Tagged ‘The Silent Movie Theatre’

The Big Blue Marble @ Cinefamily

Published May 3, 2010 by Graham

Yo Gabba Gabba’s DJ Lance Rock and animation producer Kevin Sukho Lee are guest programming a festival of children’s films this month at Cinefamily! Every Friday there’s another mind-blowing night of entertainment to delight children and grown-ups alike:

To a child, there are no boundaries of culture, no barriers to acceptance of any external stimuli — as long as it’s cool. Explosions of color, light, music and funky characters are a universal constant, and never fail to, even in our adult lives, zap our inner kid cores into sweet submission. The hit kids’ television show “Yo Gabba Gabba!”, an awesome program for kids and adults alike, is a proud proponent of this philosophy — and we’re thrilled to present guest programmers Lance Robertson (the show’s star, aka DJ Lance Rock), and animation producer Kevin Sukho Lee, as they unearth some choice childrens’ cinematic seeds from the vaults of yesteryear. From personal favorites to prominent influences to the just plain rad, they’ll orbit around this big blue marble of ours to bring you an eclectic assortment of far-out kinder-fare from around the globe.

Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo

Published March 11, 2010 by Graham

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Stop, breathe, and take a moment to appreciate how rad bugs are. Let’s send waves of positive thought about insects into the Universe. Here in the English-speaking world, where they are semiotically bound to concepts of destruction and annoyance, bugs could use some respect and affection. Not so much in Japan, as we learn in Jessica Oreck’s dazzling documentary Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo.

…While people of many other countries fear all manner of creepy crawlies, the Japanese love and respect them: they’re sold live in vending machines and department stores; they’re the subject of the No. 1 videogame MushiKing; and a single beetle recently sold for $90,000. Insects have been an integral part of the centuries-old traditions of the country, once described as the “Isle of the Dragonflies.”

The film’s gorgeous imagery links people with the strength of beetles, the music of crickets, the magic of fireflies and the endless colors of butterflies. Using bugs like an anthropologist’s toolkit, the film uncovers Japanese philosophies that will shift Westerners’ perspectives on nature, beauty, life, and even the seemingly mundane realities of their day-to-day routines.

Take the rare opportunity to reflect on the elegance of the microscopic and watch this film. It’s playing tonight at Cinefamily in L.A., for one night only. The screening will also feature a Q&A with Oreck.

Cinefamily Presents: A Tribute to Maurice Sendak

Published September 29, 2009 by Graham

Cinefamily

Here’s the official flier (lovingly illustrated by Stevenfiche) for tomorrow night’s Cinefamily event that we mentioned last week. The evening will consist of Maurice Sendak’s greatest animated adaptations, the sneak preview screening of Spike and Lance’s documentary about Maurice, and a few fun surprises! Tickets are on sale now.

Tell Them Anything You Want

Published September 25, 2009 by Graham

As if being an artistic genius weren’t enough, Maurice Sendak is an endlessly fascinating man. His candid, acerbic wit is underscored by a generous intimacy. The shocking jokes spilling out of his mouth come off as invitations to share in a special rapport. And as sharp as his fangs seem to be, most of his jabs are directed inward in hopelessly self-deprecating dismissals. When Sendak gets serious, it’s like listening to a wise sage. He’s verbose yet understated, naturally paring even his conversational speech down into economically worded insights.

Tell Them Anything You Want is Lance Bangs and Spike’s compelling personal document of Sendak’s life during the five years of Where the Wild Things Are’s production. The film airs October 14th on HBO. A special advanced screening will be held at Cinefamily in Los Angeles, this Wednesday, September 30th. Expect the unexpected!

A Tribute To Maurice Sendak

In 1963, with just 10 short sentences, a dark and dreamy emotional landscape of hairy monsters and tropical jungles, and one wannabe feral child, Maurice Sendak created one of the most critically acclaimed and popular childrens’ books of all time– “Where the Wild Things Are”. In this loving tribute to everyone’s first favorite author, the Cinefamily will show original animated adaptations (on 16mm!) of “Where the Wild Things Are” and “In the Night Kitchen”, along with new short films made by Lance Bangs and Spike Jonze while the new live action adaptation of “Wild Things…” was in production. Jonze had been friends with Maurice Sendak for more than five years before he began working on his feature film, and these new short films capture a sometimes melancholy but always wickedly funny Sendak as he reflects on his Depression-era childhood in the Brooklyn shtetl, a joyous day at the World’s Fair, the kidnapping of the Lindbergh baby, his books “In The Night Kitchen” and “Higgledy Piggledy Pop!”, his two beloved Hermans (Melville, and his German shepherd namesake), and a long-buried secret. Lance Bangs, co-director of Tell Them Anything You Want: A Portrait of Maurice Sendak will be in attendance!

Tickets - $12

Everything is Terrible: The Movie

Published June 19, 2009 by Graham

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There’s no doubt: Everything Is Terrible is the funniest and most depressing collection of found footage Cyberspace has ever seen. The group of video artists that contributes to the site keep it simple: each clip is a highlight reel of pure insanity usually culled from a single infomercial, self-improvement tape or edutainment special. Without straying too far from the source material, Everything is Terrible cuts through the filler to tastefully underscore the horror and hilarity of these all-but-forgotten bargain bin VHS marvels. While the dated, low-budget anonymity inherent in these clips makes it easy to feel distanced from the subjects of Everything Is Terrible’s playful scorn, the implicit message in all this admirable work seems to be: whenever it was made, no matter how professional it looks, just about anything can be awesomely awful– so learn to enjoy it!

The collective’s first feature-length DVD, Everything Is Terrible: The Movie, hits mailboxes tomorrow. To celebrate the release, the entire EIT gang is appearing in person tomorrow night for a special presentation at (where else?) The Silent Movie Theatre.