Posts Tagged ‘robots’

Jon Boam

Published June 3, 2010 by Molly

DSC07881

DSC07827

DSC07886

Not only do we love Jon Boam’s mural at digital marketing and communications agency Code Computerlove, we love the process photographs on Boam’s blog that illustrate paintings-in-action (as well as selected shenanigans, naturally.) See here for more.

I’m Here

Published March 19, 2010 by Graham

imhere-robots

It’s here, just in time for the weekend! We first brought you word of Spike’s new movie last August, when it was still just a “secret robot short film.” After the Sundance premiere in January, Nieves released a zine, Opening Ceremony designed flipbooks and a window display, and now finally Absolut has posted I’m Here in its entirety online. Go check out the robot romance if you’re 21 or older, and stay tuned for even more radness surrounding this lovely short!

Opening Ceremony x I’m Here

Published February 15, 2010 by Graham

im-here-opening-ceremony

The lovelorn robots from I’m Here have taken over the window display at Opening Ceremony’s New York boutique! Amazing artist Meryl Smith, who created some of the props for the film, designed the installation using original costumes, props and robot parts from I’m Here. Looking for a belated Valentine’s gift? Opening Ceremony’s got you covered with three rad double-sided I’m Here flipbooks:

Dantes Wharf

Published January 27, 2010 by Molly

Picture 2

Picture 3

Picture 4

If you had a personal in-house artist to illustrate your nightmares (and maybe a couple of your dreams), the result would be something like Dantes Wharf.

Not sure what the overarching scheme of the site is, but it sure as hell does a good job at assembling all the classic nightmare signifiers in one place. We’ve got hominid skeletons, beady-eyed reptiles, de-gloved arms, swirling indescribable polygons, disturbing girls with Princess Leia buns, overenthusiastic canines, aliens, freaky kids, ultrasound machines, jellyfish, robots, anthropomorphism, googly eyes, human hearts, the food pyramid, blood, guts, horns, beaks, contorted mannequins and so much more.

The browsing might give you a heart attack but, hey, what’s a heart attack now and then? It’s worth it. We promise.

I’m Here Debuts Today!

Published January 21, 2010 by Graham

im-here

Spike’s epic short film, I’m Here, makes its grand entrance tonight at Sundance. It’s a robot romance and a futuristic fable rooted in the universal emotions of first love, ruminating on youth, identity, autonomy and loss. What began as a small project in the wake of Where the Wild Things Are quickly blossomed into a 35-minute tale that provided Spike ample room to fully flesh out his melancholy heroes, a pair of robot lovers.

These clunky, sensitive machines feel as familiar as old friends by the end of the film, thanks in no small part to the same subtle special effects wizardry that brought the Wild Things’ facial features to life. Spike snapped the image above in the final screening to approve special effects shots before I’m Here’s worldwide premiere. If you’re in Utah today, don’t miss it!

Carson Ellis x Her 3 Year Old

Published September 15, 2009 by Graham

Carson-Ellis1

Carson-Ellis2

Doleful romance, antiquated daydreams and rococo beasts characterize the lovely work of illustrator Carson Ellis, The Decemberists’ resident artist and wife of frontman Colin Meloy. A flair for the fantastic must run in the family: the above sketches are awesome collaborations with her three-year-old son Hank, drawn while they traveled on tour with the band this summer. “Hank dictates and I illustrate,” writes Ellis on her blog, noting that their shared travel journal seems to focus on everything but travelling.

Scenes From a Secret Robot Short

Published August 26, 2009 by Graham

Spike has been hard at work on a top secret robot-related short film. When Dallas and I visited the set, the first person we bumped into was Family owner David Kramer (more on Kramer in Lance Bang’s doc Family Portrait), furiously memorizing a verse of lyrics inscribed on his palm in a parking lot beneath the freeway. Kramer, a non-musician who had joined the project only one day earlier, was preparing to play the lead singer in a fake band called The Lost Trees, alongside the members of Moonrats.

Miranda July showed up and the four of us made our way through the vast maze of a fantastically decaying abandoned building to the room where Spike was setting up The Lost Trees’ big show. Waiting for the shoot to begin in earnest, Dallas and I decided to explore the building’s musty labyrinthine corridors. Scattered remnants left over from other Hollywood productions blurred unsettlingly with authentic artifacts from the location’s functional former life as a ballroom hall/radio station.

After conquering the rooftop with its epic vistas and then descending to the depths of the building’s eerily Saw-esque basement, we returned to the set and found “The Rec Center” now occupied by a couple of radical robots adrift in a roaring sea of extras feigning their fandom for The Lost Trees. Check out the photos above to see David Kramer embracing his inner rock star, Spike and Miranda talking shop, weird finds from our backstage explorations, and Lance Bangs shooting documentary footage in his trademark visor.

Keep an eye out for the short’s premiere in November and the unveiling of Spike’s new robotic stars!