Posts Tagged ‘london’

Sarah De Bondt

Published June 9, 2010 by Molly

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Sarah De Bondt has done a whole bunch of things we could praise, but we’re gonna hunker down and focus on a few for now.

Her project The Free Library appeared a few years ago in New York and Philadelphia, and was based loosely on a film (La Chinoise) by Jean-Luc Godard. Erase any thoughts of pretense from your mind, however: the traveling installation turned each gallery into a functional library-type space where visitors were encouraged to hang out, browse books, lounge on beanbags and explore the space.

Overthrowing the King in His Own Mind” is another highlight of the De Bondt oeuvre, a persimmon-colored catalogue, poster and invitation to an exhibition at Kunstmuseum Solothurn, Switzerland. Finally, we suggest checking out Wiels, De Bondt’s ongoing work for the new contemporary art center in Brussels.

Benbo George

Published June 7, 2010 by Molly

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Benbo George’s images are the sort of thing a very talented person might come up with in a lucid dream about image manipulation. Cosmic and shimmering, the images use repetition and mirroring in ways that thwart facile interpretation. The graphic designer/illustrator claims to divide his time between Liverpool and London, but we wouldn’t be surprised if the astral plane figured into that itinerary somewhere.

Tales of the Unexpected

Published June 2, 2010 by Molly

Carl Burgess makes the weirdest, prettiest dang movies we’ve seen in weeks. Go ahead, feast your eyeballs.

Eastside Projects

Published May 18, 2010 by Molly

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Eastside Projects is an artist-run space and public gallery in Birmingham, UK. The group commissions experimental contemporary art and hosts rad exhibitions as part of a project to serve the public good. Cool, no? The current exhibition is a collection of work by the London-based artist group known as hobbypopMUSEUM, who specialize in site-specific installations that combine sound, performance, film, and painting.

Eastside Projects
has also released a bunch of awesome publications (above is an excerpt from Keith Wilson’s “What is Industry?”) including beautiful exhibition catalogs. Drop by if you’re lucky enough to be in the hood, or explore the website if you’re not. Either way, a productive experience.

Alex de Mora

Published May 5, 2010 by Molly

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Alex de Mora has an unerring eye for complicatedly beautiful scenarios, panoramas, and models in Metallica accessories. It’s important, these days, to be versatile, and de Mora fits that bill. He’s equally astute at photographing live music and adorable cats— a range to be envious of, for sure!

The artist’s blog is a running document of his adventures in picture-taking, and we highly recommend a visit. Not to mention the portfolio—which is truly a thing to behold.

Marcus Walters

Published May 4, 2010 by Molly

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It’s probably fair to say that artist/designer Marcus Walters is obsessed with simplicity. His works of drawing and collage are Matisse-like studies in how to deploy maximum expression with a minimum of flourishes. The colors are summery, the subjects range from birds to flowers to dragons, and the incorporation of handcrafted elements gives each piece a special je ne sais quoi.

Patrick Gildersleeves

Published May 3, 2010 by Molly

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Boy oh boy oh boy are we feeling Patrick Gildersleeves. The Brighton-based illustrator and artist has a deft hand with color and a knack for bustling, joyous compositions. Click through the wide range of work on his website: (illustrations, artier stuff and sketches) to get a feel for the artist’s aesthetic. It’s lovely, no?

For more info, wander over to this interview in which he speaks about his idyllic-sounding home (”a fairly pleasant village with a little wood, river and meadows nearby”) and favorite materials (mechanical pencil and gouache paint), among other things.

Loren Filis

Published April 30, 2010 by Molly

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Loren Filis draws, photographs, makes prints, devises installations and noodles around in 3D. As if that weren’t enough, the artist also runs an independent screen-printing studio, Loligo, out of an old peanut factory in London. Oi! Is there anything more inspiring than a person who busies herself with such pursuits? We’re sold on Ms. Loren.

MANYMONO

Published April 29, 2010 by Molly

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MANYMONO is a London-based Risograph printing service that produces beautiful prints, books and zines (some of which are for sale at LANDFILL).

What exactly is Risograph printing technology? Well. Risograph Duplicators are machines that look like photocopiers but have a process more simillar to screen-printing. They allow only one color to print on each pass during the machine, and by overprinting various colors an artist can build up compositions as he would by screen printing. Hence the name: MANYMONO= single color runs. Risograph machines are speedy, reliable and heatless. And with the right hands, they produce gorgeous materials like the prints above.

For Further Information

Published April 27, 2010 by Molly

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For Further Information is a small press based in London that produces some rad experimental book projects. For starters, there’s A Glossary With Some Pieces of Verse, a facsimile of an 1867 book dedicated to documenting an extinct Germanic language called Yola, spoken between the 14th and 19th century by English settlers. A useful addition to the scholarly section of your library, no?

There’s also Stills From AC37, a collection of extracts from a video installation by artist Eleanor Duffin. And The Names‚ our personal favorite, is a compilation of 20,000 spammer aliases collected between 2003 and 2008, and listed alphabetically. Pure genius.