Posts Tagged ‘Drawing’

Derek Albeck

Published May 10, 2010 by Molly

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Los Angeles-based Derek Albeck is 90% deaf in one ear, enjoys the belligerent and skilled music of Lightning Bolt and is most productive early in the morning and late at night. He would describe his work, if asked by a stranger, as “drawings from phorographs of family and surroundings. The drawings are somewhat autobiographical and serve as memory maps of shared stories and experiences.”

This is all gleaned from the artist’s interview at Fecal Face, which we recommend checking out as well as his website. Albeck’s got some neat prints, books and zines on sale on there, and a whole bunch of crazily meticulous drawings that we think are just great.

Patrick Gildersleeves

Published May 3, 2010 by Molly

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Boy oh boy oh boy are we feeling Patrick Gildersleeves. The Brighton-based illustrator and artist has a deft hand with color and a knack for bustling, joyous compositions. Click through the wide range of work on his website: (illustrations, artier stuff and sketches) to get a feel for the artist’s aesthetic. It’s lovely, no?

For more info, wander over to this interview in which he speaks about his idyllic-sounding home (”a fairly pleasant village with a little wood, river and meadows nearby”) and favorite materials (mechanical pencil and gouache paint), among other things.

Loren Filis

Published April 30, 2010 by Molly

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Loren Filis draws, photographs, makes prints, devises installations and noodles around in 3D. As if that weren’t enough, the artist also runs an independent screen-printing studio, Loligo, out of an old peanut factory in London. Oi! Is there anything more inspiring than a person who busies herself with such pursuits? We’re sold on Ms. Loren.

David Jien

Published April 29, 2010 by Molly

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In an interview at Little Paper Planes, artist David Jien talks a bit about his process, noting that he starts with an idea and progresses to research, references, sketches, and finally, a drawing. The artist, who works with graphite and paper, admits that “I work pretty slowly and my finishing time varies with every picture, but small ones usually take 2-3 days, and large ones take up to 3 months.” This makes sense, given the meticulous detail and technical verve of Jien’s drawings.

The drawings remind us (a bit obscurely) of the great Carol Reed noir film “The Third Man”, with its burnt-out postwar Vienna streetscapes, dark shadows, and sinister lurkers. Jien himself has talked about the influence of Nintendo, anime, Roald Dahl and Chinese scroll painting on his works, so what do we know? Only that there’s plenty of room for both interpretations. These are great, great drawings.

Binky Brown

Published April 26, 2010 by Molly

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“Justin Green—he’s out of his mind,” said R. Crumb.

“I could see that the work came from a permanently damaged brain,” said Kurt Vonnegut.

“Comics wouldn’t be what they are today without this book, and this new edition places it in its proper place in the comics literary canon. Thank God for Binky Brown. And thank God for Justin Green,” said Chris Ware.

If that’s not a triptych of compelling blurbs, we don’t know what is. Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary is Justin Green’s groundbreaking 1972 graphic novel, newly released in a 9″ x 12″ deluxe hardcover edition by McSweeney’s. Regarded as the first cartoonist to pen highly personal autobiographical comics, Green produced a book as tortured and loony as anything you’ve ever seen. Kudos to the publisher for greenlighting this extra-large edition, which brings Green’s work to life in a new way. Don’t skip the introduction by Art Spiegelman, either: it’s a keeper.

Juanita Cardenas

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Colombia-born Juanita Cardenas has lived in Bogota, Miami, New York, Buenos Aires and Barcelona. Her drawings? We love ‘em. Her puppets? Freaky and rad. Cardenas has a talent with color (dig her virtuosic use of pink—not an easy hue!) and an eye for unexpectedly pleasing compositions; there’s no doubt about either of those things.

We’re equally entranced, however, by the artist’s sketchbooks, which are been scanned and offered up for greedy eyes to devour. Each turning of the page reveals a fresh experiment, whether that be a figure drawing or a tangle of lines or a rainbow of abstracted faces, like sherbet spilled across the paper. Totally enchanting.

Riley Payne

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Riley Payne’s meticulous drawings of trees, kids, animals, plants, greasy spoon breakfasts and kissing couples are shot through with a quiet humor and mind-boggling attention to detail. Each drawing takes months to finish, and it’s no surprise: just look at them!

We especially enjoy the breakfast series and feline extravaganza, because everyone loves bacon and kitties.

Dan Bina

Published April 19, 2010 by Molly

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Science lesson!

The term “fluorescence”was coined by one George Gabriel Stokes in an 1852 paper for the Royal Society of London titled “On the Change of Refrangibility of Light”. Chemically speaking, fluorescence occurs when an orbital electron relaxes to its ground state after being excited to a higher quantum state by some kind of energy. Then it gets really complicated.

Fluorescent lights, on the other hand, were first brought to the public at the 1939 World’s Fair, and we can thank that event for eventually precipitating glow sticks and highlighter pens. At the very end of this long stream of influences lies Dan Bina, an artist who creates images that often incorporate hints of fluorescence. The paintings are magical—check ‘em out at Dan’s blog. Deploy shades if your eyes are sensitive.

Maarten Donders

Published April 16, 2010 by Molly

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There’s something vaguely Henry Darger-ish about Maarten Donders’ art and illustrations. Not in a weird reclusive sense, just in the sense of having a seriously unleashed imagination and a knack for fantastical colors and comics-influenced imagery.

Donders has lent his style to record covers and 140 Hits in Art, a book in which 140 artists illustrate one of their favorite songs. Donders chose Earthless, “a heavy psychedelic band who play facemelting jams.” We’d say the artist fits the subject perfectly.

Hannah Waldron

Published April 13, 2010 by Molly

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Lately we’ve been digging the work of London-based artist Hannah Waldron for its geometric complexity and beautiful palette. Her blog is a document of her work habits, experiments and obsessions: sea monsters, zoo structures, patternmaking, playing with various inks and design concepts, making silkscreens and drawing gridded rooftop patterns inspired by Berlin and Italian piazzas.

Waldron’s lovely book, Rain Day, was published by Duke Press and sold out in milliseconds, so keep your eyes peeled for the second edition.