Posts Tagged ‘Design’

Henry McCausland

Published June 8, 2010 by Molly

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When given the opportunity to gaze upon Henry McCausland’s work, it’s hard not to let the adjectives pile up willy-nilly. One’s eyes glaze over in delight and a series of words come to mind: enchanting! vivid! smart! detail-oriented!

Maybe this isn’t such a bad response to have. Maybe this is what good illustration should do: provoke the imagination, please the eyeballs, stymie the brain. In any case, there’s so much to see.

Jiro Bevis

Published June 4, 2010 by Molly

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Jiro Bevis is an illustrator with a rad name, a killer set of design skills and a knack for picking up on the grotesque element of everything from pizza pies to Nike sneakers. It’s fun to hop between categories on his website, picking out the signature elements and marveling at the variety of their deployment.

Bevis also distributes his work gracefully across a variety of mediums: tee shirts, silk screens, and so forth, some of it available for purchase at quite reasonable prices. Anyone looking to redecorate his or her clubhouse?

Arne Bellstorf

Published June 4, 2010 by Molly

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Arne Bellstorf may be a wizard of graphic novels and illustration, but he’s no lone wolf. Bellstorf also happens to have a natural instinct for collaboration and community-building, graphically speaking. Among the artist’s many projects are the annual magazine Orang, which he co-edits, and the small collective and independent publishing house Kiki Post, which puts out a variety of neat comics.

He also contributed to the 2wBOX collection with the above mini silk-screened comic, published by B.ΓΌ.L.B. comix from Switzerland. Explore the archives and parse continual updates at Bellstorf’s website.

Jillian Tamaki

Published May 27, 2010 by Molly

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How do we love Jillian Tamaki? Let us count the ways. The Canada-born and Brooklyn-based illustrator/artist illustrates for a huge variety of publications (everything from The Atlantic to Esquire), produced Skim, a graphic novel co-created with her cousin, and updates a delightful process blog whenever the inspiration strikes, which is (thankfully) often.

We love spying on Tamaki’s projects as they develop, including the tiny paper quilts made of rainbow squares which mingle with her thoughts on color theory and her spectacular, surreal collages. Check out the process blog here and don’t come crying to us if you get inspired to start your own!

Jimmy Giegerich

Published May 25, 2010 by Molly

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Jimmy Giegerich has a sequential collection titled Rude Dudes With Bad ‘Tudes, and we think that epithet describes his illustrations and comics well: they’re loud, funny, often gruesome and totally rad. Check out Giegerich’s work here and tell him we sent ya!

Ellen Kling

Published May 20, 2010 by Molly

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The varied and colorful talents of Ellen Kling are almost too far-ranging to summarize in the form of a single blog post, so we’ll just introduce you to the artist/designer and then set you on your path toward discovering her Midas touch.

Klings illustration work is truly a portfolio to behold, and her design aesthetic is one that we can only describe as “delectable” (we especially dig the ice-cream colors and celestial dessert illustrations.) The dossier also includes “Forbidden Love”, a 24-page zine about Kling’s love-hate relationship with deodorant, a couple of other small book projects, a giant red snake painted on canvas with acrylic and “Cats”, a work of paper cats embedded in layers of plexiglass. Among much more.

Finally, there’s Kling’s blog, which is an ever-unfurling document of the artist’s life and work, interspersed with charming notes on friends, movies and the way that energy drinks make her feel (weird).

Pluc Plaatsman

Published May 19, 2010 by Molly

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Aside from having a name that rolls off the tongue like a melody, Pluc Plaatsman has a crazy-original design aesthetic that draws equally on tattoo design, street art, memories, principles of typography and collage. We’re especially into his Personal Medical Dossier. In the artist’s words, “It is a manual about myself, my past and about what I can and can not do with my restriction. When people read the manual they know all they need to know to understand my situation.”

The work that results is highly personal and undeniably beautiful. Check it out here.

The Things We Are

Published May 18, 2010 by Molly

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Illustrator Joost Stokhof has a cool project that he has dubbed “Without Thinking”. This project involves a constant production of zines composed of sketches, photos, and whatever other work the illustrator finds laying around his studio. It’s a cool little project: instead of throwing all the ephemera away, Stokhof repurposes it into beautiful objects. And that’s not all!

Stokhof spends the rest of his time designing 7″ records, producing beautiful artist books like the above, and drawing and illustrating out the wazoo. We’re big fans.

Epic Supreme

Published May 17, 2010 by Molly

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Epic Supreme is the nom de design of Gregory Coats, a designer who roves among media like a hunter through the dark reaches of a magical forest. As it happens, magical forests figure into his arsenal of design inspiration, as do metallic inks, laser beams, and heavy metal.

We love the posters and screen prints on Coats’ website, and we especially dig his book design for ‘The Diamond Net” (above), an artist catalog featuring the work of Kara Tanaka and Richard Turner.

Theo Gennitsakis

Published May 12, 2010 by Molly

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We love the weird, wild, and kitschy illustration and artwork of Theo Gennitsakis, who lends his prodigious talents to everything from type illustrations to flyers to album covers to the (above) ingenious memorial to Malcolm McLaren. Gennitsakis is also the Creative Director and Founder of La Surprise, a design agency whose slogan is “Audacity is the safest path.” That’s a good one.