Posts Tagged ‘Collage’

Eric Yahnker

Published June 10, 2010 by Molly

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Conceptual art—well, maybe all art—should sock you in the gut and then hypnotize you. In that order. Eric Yahnker’s work is a one-two emotional/intellectual punch that combines immaculate craftsmanship with a brain of intimidating powers.

Witness <0 - 101 (above), a work that combines various media with numerical titles into a sequential order from “Less Than Zero” to “101 Dalmatians”. Or the artist’s colored-pencil commentaries on dianetics and Lance Armstrong. Or the beheaded John Wayne in tennis gear.

Yahnker’s work deals with death, neuropathology and the mucky vicissitudes of life in a manner that combines high-concept trickery with immediate visual appeal. Go forth, wanderer, and click heedlessly.

Joshua Petherick

Published June 9, 2010 by Molly

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The world is Joshua Petherick’s oyster. The world is also Joshua Petherick’s range of working materials. The Melbourne-based artist incorporates everything from pine shelving systems to cork rolls to squashed coins to polypropylene hessian (what is that?) to marble to bubble wrap into his unclassifiable pieces.

Needless to say, the results fascinate us. So do the titles. Petherick has a gift for language, giving his works the most enigmatic/appealing monikers imaginably. A few examples: BOOTLEG AT THE MANOR, JOINT HASSLES, WISH YOU WERE HERE (SLOWLY) and MUNDUS VULT DECIPI, ERGO DECIPIATUR (That’s Latin for, “The world wants to be deceived, so let it be deceived.”)

Benbo George

Published June 7, 2010 by Molly

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Benbo George’s images are the sort of thing a very talented person might come up with in a lucid dream about image manipulation. Cosmic and shimmering, the images use repetition and mirroring in ways that thwart facile interpretation. The graphic designer/illustrator claims to divide his time between Liverpool and London, but we wouldn’t be surprised if the astral plane figured into that itinerary somewhere.

Mark Mulroney

Published May 27, 2010 by Molly

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Thank goodness for the web: it allows artists like Mark Mulroney to amass their high-concept weirdness into one viewing zone for home audiences to pore over. We dig the site’s surreal categorical distinctions almost as much as the work contained within: collages, drawings, scanned sketchbooks and more. Give it a look.

Jillian Tamaki

Published May 27, 2010 by Molly

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How do we love Jillian Tamaki? Let us count the ways. The Canada-born and Brooklyn-based illustrator/artist illustrates for a huge variety of publications (everything from The Atlantic to Esquire), produced Skim, a graphic novel co-created with her cousin, and updates a delightful process blog whenever the inspiration strikes, which is (thankfully) often.

We love spying on Tamaki’s projects as they develop, including the tiny paper quilts made of rainbow squares which mingle with her thoughts on color theory and her spectacular, surreal collages. Check out the process blog here and don’t come crying to us if you get inspired to start your own!

Bindi Booth

Published May 13, 2010 by Molly

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Bindi Booth’s illustrations, prints, posters and textile designs have a palette of cherry-blossom pink, egg-cream white and French vanilla-yellow. They’re good enough to eat, in other words (though probably non-edible) and maintain a lusciously soft mood while still packing a punch on the printed page.

Booth also produces lovely hand-made and limited-edition folio books, which might be our new favorite collectibles. Check out the whole roster of projects here, and keep your eyes peeled for illustrations in places like Bust magazine.

Marcus Walters

Published May 4, 2010 by Molly

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It’s probably fair to say that artist/designer Marcus Walters is obsessed with simplicity. His works of drawing and collage are Matisse-like studies in how to deploy maximum expression with a minimum of flourishes. The colors are summery, the subjects range from birds to flowers to dragons, and the incorporation of handcrafted elements gives each piece a special je ne sais quoi.

Andreas Samuelsson

Published April 14, 2010 by Molly

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Remember those sticker books your parents bought to keep you occupied on long car trips? Swedish artist/designer Andreas Samuelsson’s bright, busy screenprints and editioned letterpress prints remind us of those books (but better, clearly.)

Samuelsson is fond of punchy hues and sharply-defined forms, and he works with cut paper collage, watercolor and computer graphics to create his images. Not surprisingly, he has also designed backpacks and skateboards and…well…produced sticker sheets. Because stickers never lose their appeal.

Hannah Waldron

Published April 13, 2010 by Molly

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Lately we’ve been digging the work of London-based artist Hannah Waldron for its geometric complexity and beautiful palette. Her blog is a document of her work habits, experiments and obsessions: sea monsters, zoo structures, patternmaking, playing with various inks and design concepts, making silkscreens and drawing gridded rooftop patterns inspired by Berlin and Italian piazzas.

Waldron’s lovely book, Rain Day, was published by Duke Press and sold out in milliseconds, so keep your eyes peeled for the second edition.

Maxwell Holyoke-Hirsch

Published March 30, 2010 by Molly

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Maxwell Holyoke-Hirsch has created illustrations and images for everything from old guards like The New Yorker to WLYS favorites GOOD Magazine.

Holyoke-Hirsch does gorgeous, risky things with color, and his illustrations are both expressive and precise—a thorny balance to strike. The artist’s positive energy and enthusiasm are also infectious in the best possible way: check out his blog for proof, as well as this visual diary of his process, easily one of the most articulate (yet: wordless!) accounts of creativity we’ve seen on the internets.