Posts Tagged ‘Art’

Danny Sangra

Published May 4, 2010 by Molly

Danny Sangra’s FILM NUMBER 9 is an ode to woodsy rambles and sweet leather jackets. It combines a few of our most favorite things— tangly trees, pretty ladies, heavy percussion, and exploration—into a kooky pastoral odyssey.

More of the artist’s films can be spotted over on his Vimeo page, including the trailer for DOOMSDAY KIDS SAY HEY, which combines water towers, chalk drawings and greasy breakfasts into an irresistible set of clues for something we can’t wait to unravel.

Marcus Walters

Published May 4, 2010 by Molly

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It’s probably fair to say that artist/designer Marcus Walters is obsessed with simplicity. His works of drawing and collage are Matisse-like studies in how to deploy maximum expression with a minimum of flourishes. The colors are summery, the subjects range from birds to flowers to dragons, and the incorporation of handcrafted elements gives each piece a special je ne sais quoi.

Patrick Gildersleeves

Published May 3, 2010 by Molly

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Boy oh boy oh boy are we feeling Patrick Gildersleeves. The Brighton-based illustrator and artist has a deft hand with color and a knack for bustling, joyous compositions. Click through the wide range of work on his website: (illustrations, artier stuff and sketches) to get a feel for the artist’s aesthetic. It’s lovely, no?

For more info, wander over to this interview in which he speaks about his idyllic-sounding home (”a fairly pleasant village with a little wood, river and meadows nearby”) and favorite materials (mechanical pencil and gouache paint), among other things.

MANYMONO

Published April 29, 2010 by Molly

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MANYMONO is a London-based Risograph printing service that produces beautiful prints, books and zines (some of which are for sale at LANDFILL).

What exactly is Risograph printing technology? Well. Risograph Duplicators are machines that look like photocopiers but have a process more simillar to screen-printing. They allow only one color to print on each pass during the machine, and by overprinting various colors an artist can build up compositions as he would by screen printing. Hence the name: MANYMONO= single color runs. Risograph machines are speedy, reliable and heatless. And with the right hands, they produce gorgeous materials like the prints above.

Jamie Daughters

Published April 26, 2010 by Molly

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Jamie Daughters takes pictures that absorb broad vistas and condense them for maximum visual impact. The subject matter ranges from midnight waffle houses to haunting portraits to broad swaths of farmland. All of it is imbued with a tranquility and solemnity that’s uncommon in photography these days. Take in the views here.

Go With The Guts

Published April 23, 2010 by Molly

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Go With The Guts is an excellently-titled online shop for purchasing limited edition prints. The pieces are hand-printed using traditional printmaking techniques like lithography, wood-block, monoprinting, etching or silkscreen. See guys, this is what the internet does best: collect and curate the best that’s out there and bring it to the world in controlled doses.

Contributors to the project include Lukas Zimmerman (prints from cardboard cutouts) Linus Bill (silkscreen prints), Eric Anderson (wood-block prints) and many more. If the individual efforts are all completely respectable, the cumulative effect is radder than rad.

Daniel Weiss

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Photographer Daniel Weiss has an eye for the elegiac (or straight-up bizarre) detail that makes a picture tell a thousand words. His photographs are witty, pretty and wise. Check out the New Yorkers series and the Street Scenes, both of which are spirited and immaculate. We love ‘em!

Weiss also keeps up a photoblog which actively documents his NYC adventures: a stroll down 9th Avenue, an encounter with a karate-chopping Frenchman named Jean-Pierre who claims a past friendship with Frank Sinatra and enjoys feeding squirrels in the park, buskers in the subway, and more. It’s a huge pleasure to scroll through, like taking an epic walk around the city with a pair of fresh eyes.

Riley Payne

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Riley Payne’s meticulous drawings of trees, kids, animals, plants, greasy spoon breakfasts and kissing couples are shot through with a quiet humor and mind-boggling attention to detail. Each drawing takes months to finish, and it’s no surprise: just look at them!

We especially enjoy the breakfast series and feline extravaganza, because everyone loves bacon and kitties.

Petra Cortright

Published April 21, 2010 by Molly

Sometimes it’s not a bad thing for art to be inscrutable— provided that its inscrutability invites further attention rather than repelling it. Petra Cortright’s work is nothing if not a cypher, but it certainly makes for alluring objects of interpretation. Cortright’s animated gifs, videos and still image pieces take their aesthetic inspiration straight from the lore of the internet, drawing on misspellings and trailing cursors and emoticons to form genuinely stunning experiences.

Cortright has talked about her love of google image search, weirdo software effects and default settings. “I am a really impatient person,” she said in an interview last year. “Gifs and webcams are so fast, low file size, load fast, they are almost scraps. I like not having the commitment of working with hi-def vid/images.” Viewers need not be scholars in internet history to enjoy the work, however: “Even if the internet references pass over some heads all my work is so extremely visual and people can enjoy it on that level alone,” Cortright clarifies.

Sabotagem

Published April 21, 2010 by Molly

Bruno Dicolla’s video Sabotagem is a technicolor dreamscape of hopping bunnies, squirming organic forms (is that a butterfly or a millipede or a flying millipede?) and what look like migrating amoebae. See more of the work on Dicolla’s website and flickr page. In a world designed by us, this is what the iTunes visualizer would look like. Simply beauteous.