Archive for the ‘Design’ Category

Bianca Hester

Published June 10, 2010 by Molly

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Oh, what we’d give to visit the studio of Bianca Hester! Hester is an artist/handywoman/creator across all platforms living output is so varied and so unexpected that we can’t quite wrap our heads around the whole of it.

For starters, Hester makes and modifies instruments, orchestrates fruitful installations and collaborations, produces lovely art books, writes with great insight, creates video, turns leftover installation materials into light fixtures for her friends, and, need we say it…MUCH MORE.

Sarah De Bondt

Published June 9, 2010 by Molly

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Sarah De Bondt has done a whole bunch of things we could praise, but we’re gonna hunker down and focus on a few for now.

Her project The Free Library appeared a few years ago in New York and Philadelphia, and was based loosely on a film (La Chinoise) by Jean-Luc Godard. Erase any thoughts of pretense from your mind, however: the traveling installation turned each gallery into a functional library-type space where visitors were encouraged to hang out, browse books, lounge on beanbags and explore the space.

Overthrowing the King in His Own Mind” is another highlight of the De Bondt oeuvre, a persimmon-colored catalogue, poster and invitation to an exhibition at Kunstmuseum Solothurn, Switzerland. Finally, we suggest checking out Wiels, De Bondt’s ongoing work for the new contemporary art center in Brussels.

Ditto Press

Published June 8, 2010 by Molly

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Holy smokes, Ditto Press is so cool we could plotz. The UK-based independent publisher produces the most beautiful books imaginable using Risograph technology (do we sense a growing sector of Risograph devotees?) and incredible bookbinding techniques. The shop and blog are practically epilepsy-inducing in its variety and desirability, offering books that range on topics including academia, fine art, photography, popular culture, literature and poetry. Zoinks? Zoinks.

Selected highlights include a revisited Edgar Allen Poe story (designed and produced in-house), prints by WLYS favorite Jiro Bevis, a limited edition book by Joseph Clayton Mills, “Herschel’s Telescope”, a 2-color riso printing for Laurence Barber with exposed-sewn single page sections and 9 digitally produced gate-folded inserts…and so much more.

Jiro Bevis

Published June 4, 2010 by Molly

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Jiro Bevis is an illustrator with a rad name, a killer set of design skills and a knack for picking up on the grotesque element of everything from pizza pies to Nike sneakers. It’s fun to hop between categories on his website, picking out the signature elements and marveling at the variety of their deployment.

Bevis also distributes his work gracefully across a variety of mediums: tee shirts, silk screens, and so forth, some of it available for purchase at quite reasonable prices. Anyone looking to redecorate his or her clubhouse?

Arne Bellstorf

Published June 4, 2010 by Molly

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Arne Bellstorf may be a wizard of graphic novels and illustration, but he’s no lone wolf. Bellstorf also happens to have a natural instinct for collaboration and community-building, graphically speaking. Among the artist’s many projects are the annual magazine Orang, which he co-edits, and the small collective and independent publishing house Kiki Post, which puts out a variety of neat comics.

He also contributed to the 2wBOX collection with the above mini silk-screened comic, published by B.ΓΌ.L.B. comix from Switzerland. Explore the archives and parse continual updates at Bellstorf’s website.

Jim Stoten

Published June 4, 2010 by Molly

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Jim Stoten’s illustrations manage to have a distinctly wonky, vintage OZ Magazine vibe while also conveying their modern messages with precision and subtlety. Some things the artist is especially good at drawing include: pirates, bugles, ruddy monarchs, everyday activities such as hanging the laundry or reading a book, and balloons. And that’s just a sample!

Check out Stoten’s website for examples, as well as a blog chock full o’ sketches, updates, tip-offs and works-in-progress.

Travess Smalley

Published June 1, 2010 by Molly

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We’re not clear on how we wound up at Travess Smalley’s web page, but we happily spent a solid chunk of time staring hypnotized at the never-ending wall of images Smalley has arranged for all to see. Imagine, if you will, that a Magic Eye puzzle book consumed the entire internet circa 1997, entered a wormhole, took a cat-nap, woke up and shouted “HELLO” to the world. That’s a starting description. We challenge you to come up with a better one.

Jillian Tamaki

Published May 27, 2010 by Molly

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How do we love Jillian Tamaki? Let us count the ways. The Canada-born and Brooklyn-based illustrator/artist illustrates for a huge variety of publications (everything from The Atlantic to Esquire), produced Skim, a graphic novel co-created with her cousin, and updates a delightful process blog whenever the inspiration strikes, which is (thankfully) often.

We love spying on Tamaki’s projects as they develop, including the tiny paper quilts made of rainbow squares which mingle with her thoughts on color theory and her spectacular, surreal collages. Check out the process blog here and don’t come crying to us if you get inspired to start your own!

Chuck Groenink

Published May 26, 2010 by Molly

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We stumbled upon Chuck Groenink after moaning with awe at his submission to Terrible Terrible Yellow eyes (it’s so dreamy!) but became further enchanted upon taking a quick tour of his website, which showcases a roster of illustrations and serials.

For a biographical note, Groenink reveals that he grew up “in an overgrown village somewhere among the moors and peat bogs in the north of the Netherlands.” If that doesn’t sound like a fairy-tale recipe for productively unhinged imaginative activity, we don’t know what does! Groenink also lists as his interests old towns, damp forests, creepie crawlies and almonds, which fills out the picture perfectly.

Jimmy Giegerich

Published May 25, 2010 by Molly

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Jimmy Giegerich has a sequential collection titled Rude Dudes With Bad ‘Tudes, and we think that epithet describes his illustrations and comics well: they’re loud, funny, often gruesome and totally rad. Check out Giegerich’s work here and tell him we sent ya!