Archive for April, 2010

Jamie Daughters

Published April 26, 2010 by Molly

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Jamie Daughters takes pictures that absorb broad vistas and condense them for maximum visual impact. The subject matter ranges from midnight waffle houses to haunting portraits to broad swaths of farmland. All of it is imbued with a tranquility and solemnity that’s uncommon in photography these days. Take in the views here.

Binky Brown

Published April 26, 2010 by Molly

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“Justin Green—he’s out of his mind,” said R. Crumb.

“I could see that the work came from a permanently damaged brain,” said Kurt Vonnegut.

“Comics wouldn’t be what they are today without this book, and this new edition places it in its proper place in the comics literary canon. Thank God for Binky Brown. And thank God for Justin Green,” said Chris Ware.

If that’s not a triptych of compelling blurbs, we don’t know what is. Binky Brown Meets the Holy Virgin Mary is Justin Green’s groundbreaking 1972 graphic novel, newly released in a 9″ x 12″ deluxe hardcover edition by McSweeney’s. Regarded as the first cartoonist to pen highly personal autobiographical comics, Green produced a book as tortured and loony as anything you’ve ever seen. Kudos to the publisher for greenlighting this extra-large edition, which brings Green’s work to life in a new way. Don’t skip the introduction by Art Spiegelman, either: it’s a keeper.

Mirrors, Mirrors in the Mind

Published April 23, 2010 by Graham

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“A Psychoanalytic Symposium on Comedy, Loss, Attachment & Projection” is the catchy tagline for a conference about the work of Charlie Kaufman going down tomorrow at UCLA. It’s called Mirrors, Mirrors in the Mind: Reflections on the Films of Charlie Kaufman and it features a veritable fleet of MDs and PHDs discussing Being John Malkovich, Adaptation, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, and Synecdoche, New York from 9:00am to 4:30pm.

As entertainment that satisfies both academic and psychoanalytic exploration, Kaufman’s films offer complex insight into the pain and projection that exists between people by exploring themes of consciousness, integrity, loss, memory, trauma and finitude.

Though stylistically different, his films raise questions about the creative process as defensive vs. growth-promoting mental activity and illustrate how we live with internal primitive mental states in a nuanced world of human relatedness.

There are still a few seats left, so if you’ve ever had your mind blown by a Charlie Kaufman movie, you’d be foolish not to check out this one of a kind discussion!

LCD Soundsystem – Drunk Girls (the making of)

Published April 23, 2010 by Dallas

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Check out Tim Barber’s full coverage at Tiny Vices.

Go With The Guts

Published April 23, 2010 by Molly

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Go With The Guts is an excellently-titled online shop for purchasing limited edition prints. The pieces are hand-printed using traditional printmaking techniques like lithography, wood-block, monoprinting, etching or silkscreen. See guys, this is what the internet does best: collect and curate the best that’s out there and bring it to the world in controlled doses.

Contributors to the project include Lukas Zimmerman (prints from cardboard cutouts) Linus Bill (silkscreen prints), Eric Anderson (wood-block prints) and many more. If the individual efforts are all completely respectable, the cumulative effect is radder than rad.

Juanita Cardenas

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Colombia-born Juanita Cardenas has lived in Bogota, Miami, New York, Buenos Aires and Barcelona. Her drawings? We love ‘em. Her puppets? Freaky and rad. Cardenas has a talent with color (dig her virtuosic use of pink—not an easy hue!) and an eye for unexpectedly pleasing compositions; there’s no doubt about either of those things.

We’re equally entranced, however, by the artist’s sketchbooks, which are been scanned and offered up for greedy eyes to devour. Each turning of the page reveals a fresh experiment, whether that be a figure drawing or a tangle of lines or a rainbow of abstracted faces, like sherbet spilled across the paper. Totally enchanting.

Daniel Weiss

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Photographer Daniel Weiss has an eye for the elegiac (or straight-up bizarre) detail that makes a picture tell a thousand words. His photographs are witty, pretty and wise. Check out the New Yorkers series and the Street Scenes, both of which are spirited and immaculate. We love ‘em!

Weiss also keeps up a photoblog which actively documents his NYC adventures: a stroll down 9th Avenue, an encounter with a karate-chopping Frenchman named Jean-Pierre who claims a past friendship with Frank Sinatra and enjoys feeding squirrels in the park, buskers in the subway, and more. It’s a huge pleasure to scroll through, like taking an epic walk around the city with a pair of fresh eyes.

Riley Payne

Published April 22, 2010 by Molly

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Riley Payne’s meticulous drawings of trees, kids, animals, plants, greasy spoon breakfasts and kissing couples are shot through with a quiet humor and mind-boggling attention to detail. Each drawing takes months to finish, and it’s no surprise: just look at them!

We especially enjoy the breakfast series and feline extravaganza, because everyone loves bacon and kitties.

Petra Cortright

Published April 21, 2010 by Molly

Sometimes it’s not a bad thing for art to be inscrutable— provided that its inscrutability invites further attention rather than repelling it. Petra Cortright’s work is nothing if not a cypher, but it certainly makes for alluring objects of interpretation. Cortright’s animated gifs, videos and still image pieces take their aesthetic inspiration straight from the lore of the internet, drawing on misspellings and trailing cursors and emoticons to form genuinely stunning experiences.

Cortright has talked about her love of google image search, weirdo software effects and default settings. “I am a really impatient person,” she said in an interview last year. “Gifs and webcams are so fast, low file size, load fast, they are almost scraps. I like not having the commitment of working with hi-def vid/images.” Viewers need not be scholars in internet history to enjoy the work, however: “Even if the internet references pass over some heads all my work is so extremely visual and people can enjoy it on that level alone,” Cortright clarifies.

Sabotagem

Published April 21, 2010 by Molly

Bruno Dicolla’s video Sabotagem is a technicolor dreamscape of hopping bunnies, squirming organic forms (is that a butterfly or a millipede or a flying millipede?) and what look like migrating amoebae. See more of the work on Dicolla’s website and flickr page. In a world designed by us, this is what the iTunes visualizer would look like. Simply beauteous.