Archive for April, 2010

Loren Filis

Published April 30, 2010 by Molly

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Loren Filis draws, photographs, makes prints, devises installations and noodles around in 3D. As if that weren’t enough, the artist also runs an independent screen-printing studio, Loligo, out of an old peanut factory in London. Oi! Is there anything more inspiring than a person who busies herself with such pursuits? We’re sold on Ms. Loren.

Archive Check Shirt

Published April 30, 2010 by Molly

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Dang, would you look at that pattern? It’s hard to define the beauty of those checks: they’re part video-game, part pastoral, part traditional. You’d never guess that the fabric for this shirt was sourced from the 1980s archives of a Portuguese textile mill and then re-colored to form an “archive check” pattern in loose, unbrushed cotton flannel. Also rad? This shirt would look equally swell on a lady or a dude, and we always dig the unisex vibe.

Dispersive Hymns

Published April 30, 2010 by Molly

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Laurence Punshon’s sculptural set-ups remind us of hotel lobbies, alien invasions, blue seas and nameless horror. The still-lifes are sort of an artistic Rorschach blot test: a viewer will look at them and see the contents of his own consciousness reflected back at him——or that’s how we’re calling it, anyhow.

However you interpret the pieces, they’re certainly compelling and more than a little weird. But understated-weird, like dreams that border on scary but don’t quite cross that border. Tell us, what do you see?

Matt Jones @ Oblong Gallery

Published April 29, 2010 by Graham

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Star photographer Matt Jones comes from a clan of uber-creative visual artists– his father is Terry Jones, creator of I-D magazine, and his sister is fashion photographer Katy Jones– so it’s no surprise that he has a gifted eye. But he’s carved out a signature style that’s all his own, as evidenced in his images that will soon be on display as a part of his solo show at The Oblong Gallery in London. Included in those are some fantastic portraits from the set of Where the Wild Things Are. Don’t pass up a chance to see Jones’ photos up close!

MANYMONO

Published April 29, 2010 by Molly

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MANYMONO is a London-based Risograph printing service that produces beautiful prints, books and zines (some of which are for sale at LANDFILL).

What exactly is Risograph printing technology? Well. Risograph Duplicators are machines that look like photocopiers but have a process more simillar to screen-printing. They allow only one color to print on each pass during the machine, and by overprinting various colors an artist can build up compositions as he would by screen printing. Hence the name: MANYMONO= single color runs. Risograph machines are speedy, reliable and heatless. And with the right hands, they produce gorgeous materials like the prints above.

David Jien

Published April 29, 2010 by Molly

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In an interview at Little Paper Planes, artist David Jien talks a bit about his process, noting that he starts with an idea and progresses to research, references, sketches, and finally, a drawing. The artist, who works with graphite and paper, admits that “I work pretty slowly and my finishing time varies with every picture, but small ones usually take 2-3 days, and large ones take up to 3 months.” This makes sense, given the meticulous detail and technical verve of Jien’s drawings.

The drawings remind us (a bit obscurely) of the great Carol Reed noir film “The Third Man”, with its burnt-out postwar Vienna streetscapes, dark shadows, and sinister lurkers. Jien himself has talked about the influence of Nintendo, anime, Roald Dahl and Chinese scroll painting on his works, so what do we know? Only that there’s plenty of room for both interpretations. These are great, great drawings.

Aeroplanes Exist

Published April 28, 2010 by Molly

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Vijay Khurana’s personal mini-zine Aeroplanes Exist is an offering in the time-honored tradition of personal mini-zines. It is quarter-sized, written on a charmingly jumpy typewriter, and embellished with carefully-chosen images notable for their metaphorical impact and obliquity.

The writing is hard to describe. Little stories, snippets of recalled conversation, fragments of aphorisms, all woven together in a delicate balance. It’s available at Bird in the Hand Zine Shop, and we can think of nothing better to carry in your back pocket.

Allison Schulnik

Published April 28, 2010 by Molly

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Painter, filmmaker and sculptress Allison Schulnik has complex conceptions of doom and gloom. She’s a natural creator with a formidable intellect and a far-reaching curiosity— someone who can talk about art as well as she produces it. Schulnik’s oneiric paintings of long-haired hobos, Klaus Kinski, monkey heads, clowns, skeletons, black cats transmute the strange subjects into striking totems; the results are not what you’d expect.

“I seem to be drawn to sad characters,” the artist explains in a Fecal Face interview. “The forlorn reject. Something about being on the outside. The outcast… I’m not really interested in what’s accepted by people. I like the things, places and characters that have been forsaken. On both sides of the field. The happy genius fool and the pathetic misfit. I guess I like drama.”

Check out more of the interview here. We also love that Schulnik fills her non-art-making time with making music, eating cheeseburgers and dancing. Whatta life!

For Further Information

Published April 27, 2010 by Molly

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For Further Information is a small press based in London that produces some rad experimental book projects. For starters, there’s A Glossary With Some Pieces of Verse, a facsimile of an 1867 book dedicated to documenting an extinct Germanic language called Yola, spoken between the 14th and 19th century by English settlers. A useful addition to the scholarly section of your library, no?

There’s also Stills From AC37, a collection of extracts from a video installation by artist Eleanor Duffin. And The Names‚ our personal favorite, is a compilation of 20,000 spammer aliases collected between 2003 and 2008, and listed alphabetically. Pure genius.

Genevieve DF Simms

Published April 27, 2010 by Molly

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Genevieve DF Simms is an illustrator and artist whose bold, swirling images we can’t get enough of. Her website assembles a bunch of her illustration work, as well as limited-edition silkscreened posters and prints available for purchase.

We’re also enamored of Genevieve’s blog, which collects her process sketches, adventures in Google image search and thoughts on the role of an artist/illustrator. “One of my favourite things about doing illustration assignments,” she writes, “is that one must often explore things that they may not otherwise investigate.” There are also photo studies and one-offs like this awesome inventory of Genevieve’s treasures, inspired by the A&E show Hoarders. Neat!